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Pest Control In Nepal-Bedbugs
LIFE CYCLE OF BED BUG

Bed bugs are nocturnal, reddish-brown insects that feed on the blood of humans and other warm-blooded animals. These wingless insects have dorsoventrally flattened bodies that allow them to hide in areas such as floor cracks, carpets, beds and upholstered furniture. A bed bug’s life begins with an egg, grain like and milky white in color. Female bed bugs lay between one and five eggs each day and may lie up to 500 eggs within one lifetime. Eggs are laid singly or in clusters and are placed within tight cracks or crevices. The egg is approximately 1 mm in length and is comparable in size to two grains of salt. Within two weeks, eggs hatch and immature bed bugs begin immediately to feed. These young bed bugs, or nymphs, pass through five molts before reaching maturity. Although nymphs appear similar to adults, they are smaller in size and are not yet sexually mature. Young nymphs are also yellow-white in color, while older nymphs and adults are reddish-brown. In order to complete a molting stage, each nymph requires a blood meal. At room temperature, nymphs molt and become adults within five weeks. Upon reaching maturity, bed bug adults often make weekly feedings. The life span of a bed bug most commonly ranges from four to six months. However, some bed bugs may live up to a year under cool conditions and with no food.

ANATOMY OF BED BUG

Bed bugs, often spelled as “bedbugs,” are reddish brown, ovoid and wingless. Because they are dorsoventrally flattened, they have the advantage of hiding in crevices. The shape of a bed bug’s body is comparable to a lentil or apple seed. Hatchlings are as small as poppy seeds, while adults may grow up to 5 mm in length. A common misconception is that they are invisible to the naked eye. While the newly hatched nymphs can be difficult to see, the older nymphs and adults are large enough to see clearly. Bed bugs range in color from translucent white when first hatched to dark brown or burnt orange as adults. Bed bugs redden immediately after consuming a host’s blood. Like most insects, bed bugs have six legs, a head, a thorax and an abdomen. If you believe you have identified a bedbug within your home, contact us to arrange for an inspection.

INSECTS RESEMBLING BED BUGS

Some insects, such as bat and barn swallow bugs, share the physical appearance of common bed bugs. They all belong to the family Cimicidae. The physical differences such as the length of hairs on the thorax often are subtle and require magnification. All of these bugs have short, wide heads like those of the bed bug. Their bodies are broad and flat, enabling them to crawl into narrow crevices. All of them feed on blood, but the preferred source varies depending on species. For example, bat bugs prefer to feed solely upon bats. Furthermore, while bed bugs infest crevices, furniture and bedding within human homes, bat bugs inhabit the abandoned nests of bats, birds and other small mammals. The poultry bug, also known as the Mexican chicken bug, also resembles the bed bug. Poultry bugs live on poultry farms and, unlike bed bugs, are parasites of birds and domestic fowl, such as turkeys, eagles and hawks. Bed bugs feed primarily upon human blood, although they may choose to feed on other warm-blooded animals as well. Barn swallow bugs also appear similar to bed bugs. While both insects are approximately the same in color and size, barn swallow bugs are covered in long, silky hair. Barn swallow bugs inhabit the nests of cliff swallows and may inhabit human dwellings when birds migrate. Swallow bugs breed freely in summer and are capable of surviving without food for long periods of time by remaining semidormant.